The Drowning Kind by Jennifer McMahon

 Release Date - April 6, 2021


Outside of a few years growing up in Cupertino, California, I've spent the majority of my life in Vermont. I've waded in the river in Barnet find concretions and know Chittenden County like the back of my hand. I love reading books set in Vermont as there is that familiarity that always makes me feel like I've been there and know what the characters are experiencing. That said, Brunswick Spring's story that's portrayed in The Drowning Kind was new to me and fascinating. 

Jax has built a life for herself far away from her Grandmother's estate. It meant cutting off her sister, and the two were once extremely close. Lexie's manic nature and fascination with the creepy spring-fed pool on the estate that their grandmother left to Lexie has a lot to do with it. One night, Jax gets the call that Lexie is dead. She's another of the pool's victims. She immediately feels guilty as Lexie had left a lot of messages that Jax ignored.

In Vermont, Jax learns her sister was investigating the pool's and estate's history. Something in their family history may have been what led to Lexie's death. Part of it involves going back to the 1920s when newlywed Ethel Monroe decided she would do anything for a baby, including a trip to a local spring that has the power to give you your dearest wish.

The Drowning Kind flips seamlessly between the late-1920s, Lexie and Jax's childhood, and the current day with the story told from both Jax's and Ethel's points of view. The story is that bit creepy without being so scary you'll wind up with nightmares. I was hooked.

As I read it, it reminded me a bit of the novels I've read by a writer who lived close to my childhood home. If you haven't read Joe Citro, I recommend his fiction novels, providing you can find copies. In the meantime, go back and read Jennifer McMahon's other novels as each one has impressed me.

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