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Thursday, September 6, 2018

Sadie by Courtney Summers

Release Date - September 4, 2018



Sadie Hunter disappeared not too long after her younger sister's body was found. The case captures the attention of radio producer West McCray when he comes to Cold Creek, Colorado, to record his "Forgotten Towns" segment. He has mixed feelings about investigating a girl's murder and another girl's disappearance, but he's also drawn to the case. He wants to know what became of 19-year-old Sadie.

Growing up, Sadie was more a mother figure to her sister than anything else. Sadie saw it as her job to protect, nurture, and love Mattie. When 13-year-old Mattie died, Sadie's world fell apart. Her grandmother couldn't do anything to help. Sadie developed one clear goal. The police may not have done a great job, but that won't stop Sadie from uncovering the truth. Armed only with a knife and cash, Sadie takes off.

West hears of the family's story at a gas station. He's intrigued and opts to take a closer look after talking to the grandmother. It's a long, dark journey, but when Sadie's car is found empty and abandoned with no sign of her, West can't help but push harder to uncover the truth.

Told from two viewpoints, Sadie changes between West McCray and Sadie. West's broadcast involves interviews with the girls' grandmother, as well as some of the people who know something about them or the case. Sadie's story is told as she travels thousands of miles in search of a killer.

I couldn't put the book down. I was hooked from the start and appreciated the story's structure. West's part reads like a podcast with the different speakers during interviews. The changes in format made it an incredibly quick, powerful read. It's just as gripping to an adult as it would be to a teen. I became engrossed from the first page and didn't put it down till I was done. It's gritty, terrifying, and sad all at once. It's also very, very real. While it's not a true story, it certainly feels like it could be.

There's plenty of buzz about this book already. That buzz is deserved. Read Sadie and see why.





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