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Thursday, December 29, 2016

Wrecked by Elle Casey

Setting: Remote Island
Genre: Teen Fiction
Publisher: Amazon Digital Services
Release Date: November 2013



It should be a time of excitement as spoiled twins Kevin and Sarah head off on a family cruise. The issue is that they don't care for the company they're about to keep. Their dad is hoping to wine and dine his way into a business venture with Mr. Buckley, the father to their nerdy classmates Jonathan and Candi.

For Jonathan and Candi, it's not easy to hide the crushes they have on Sarah and Kevin. The problem is that jock Kevin and popular girl Sarah would never be caught dead with them. When the cruise ship encounters issues, the four find themselves stranded on a remote island together. Left alone, it's up to them to not only survive by forming a strong team working together.

That's the general premise in Wrecked. Think of it as the popular Brooke Shield's film Blue Lagoon but with more characters. Here's where the review gets difficult. I always loved Blue Lagoon and it's realistic path. Teens left alone on an island with little to do and survival to maintain are going to find themselves in tricky situations. All of that comes true in Wrecked. Yet, there were sections of the story where the characters were more upset about potentially missing prom and that they needed to hold their own prom that the magic of the story started to get lost. I couldn't sympathize with any of them. In their shoes, I'd be stockpiling foods, making water safe to drink, and planning ahead for a storm.

If you can get past the realities that pop into your head, Wrecked is a decent read. I, unfortunately, wondered how some kids who were clearly smart could be so dense in other ways and that took some of the enjoyment away.

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