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Friday, September 18, 2015

Sunday Dinner: Coming of Age in the Segregated South by Ann Boult Walling



Release Date - July 2015

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Book Review by Tracy Farnsworth

I admit that my draw to Sunday Dinner: Coming of Age in the Segregated South was mainly for the old-time recipes. I love to cook, but it's the recipes handed down from my grandmother that are the most cherished. I hoped I'd find the same joy from Sunday Dinner.

Author Ann Boult Walling shares her own family recipes and stories in this memoir. At first I feared the recipes I'd hoped for were absent, but they are given at the end of the book, there is not an abundance, but there are recipes I can't wait to try, such as peach preserves, scalloped asparagus, and "White Salad."

The majority of this memoir shares the author's family stories from the early history of her grandmother's home, including photos, to the 1950s when segregation ended. Photos are scattered throughout, along with very touching stories.

That said, I've often wondered how far interest in a story will stretch. I'm by no means a history buff, so my interest in the story beyond the recipes became limited. The stories are engaging, but as a northerner who grew up well after segregation, I didn't really feel connected to the time or location. If you enjoy history, however, I do think you'll love every moment of Ann Boult Walling's memoir.


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