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Friday, August 7, 2015

Weightless by Sarah Bannan



Release Date - July 2015

Sarah Bannan
St. Martin's Griffin

Release Date - July 2015

Face it. High school for the majority sucked. I remember one girl telling me she was going to kill me if I ever talked to her boyfriend again. I had another, a supposed best friend, create a secret vote for "pig of the year" after she got mad with me for whatever reason. With her it could have been anything from my parents were nicer to she was jealous that I was wearing name brands and she wasn't.

Fast forward 30 years and imagine what it would be like with Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and a myriad of other social media apps and sites. I cannot even begin to imagine. That's the topic in Weightless, the debut novel by Sarah Bannan.

The unnamed narrators are fascinated by the new girl, a New Jersey teen who's been uprooted to a small Alabama town. Carolyn is gorgeous, and it's not long before she captures the attention of the high school quarterback. The problem is that Shane already has a girlfriend, a cheerleader named Brooke, but soon he's being seen holding Carolyn's hand, not Brooke's. Brooke will not stand for that and makes it her goal to change Carolyn's golden girl image to that of a boyfriend-stealing slut. It's a goal that ends up changing everyone's lives.

The author states that it was the story of Phoebe Prince that helped her research this novel. Honestly, there are so many stories out there that this will seem ripped from the headlines. It's sad, it's frustrating, and it really just makes me angry that some kids still are not getting it.

Here's what was really different about Weightless. I read a lot of books, but I cannot recall ever reading a book written in first person plural. What you read is an account from Carolyn's peers, not her friends, just other students who knew her from the swim team. They're never identified by name. At first, it seemed a little jarring, but the more I read, the more I realized this was the perfect way to tell Carolyn's story. I was hooked.




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