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Tuesday, June 23, 2015

The Idea of Love by Patti Callahan Henry



Release Date - June 23, 2015

Patti Callahan Henry
St. Martins Press

Book Review by Tracy Farnsworth

I've read other Patti Callahan Henry books and loved every second of them. With The Idea of Love, I admit I struggled a bit more. However, given my past experiences with her books, I kept reading because I knew I was missing something.

Hunter Adderman, aka Hollywood screenwriter Blake Hunter,  is in a small coastal South Carolina town posing as a writer of history books. His last couple of movies were flops, and he's trying to find that one idea that screams blockbuster.

Ella Flynn, a local salesperson, spins a tale with Hunter/Blake about being a widow. She says her husband drowned trying to retrieve her hat that fell into the ocean. The truth is that her husband left her for her best friend's sister, but she'd rather have people believe she's a widow.

As the two get to know each other, they continue spinning their lies. They figure this is a brief romance, but soon enough they question if they really know what love is and if a relationship built on lies has any hope at being the real thing.

From the start, with all of the lies they tell each other, I started to question if I even cared if Hunter/Blake and Ella found their happily ever after. Ella seemed far too naive, especially in her place of work, and Hunter, well suffice it to say I really didn't like him.

Yet, as I kept reading, I started warming up to them. By the end of the book, I was glued to the pages. The problem remained getting there. For a good half of the book, I really didn't care and would have easily rated this book a two, two and a half. By the time I finished The Idea of Love, I had completely turned around. This is a very touching tale, but it's one that you are going to have to stick with it.

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