The In-Between Hour by Barbara Claypole White



Release Date - January 2014

Barbara Claypole White
Mira

Book Review by Tracy Farnsworth

Will Shepard's son died in a tragic car accident. Since that day, his father, a resident of Hawk's Ridge Retirement Community, has suffered from short-term memory loss and doesn't remember that his grandson is dead. Will, a writer, pretends that his son is alive and traveling Europe for his father's sake, but it's becoming increasingly difficult  and, at times, he considers telling his father the truth in hopes it might sink in.

Hannah, a holistic veterinarian, son, a graduate student, is back in her home after threatening to kill himself. Hannah knows too much about suicide, her own father killed himself, and she's desperate to show her son that life is worth living. Hannah's friend Poppy volunteers at Hawk's Ridge, and it's that link that brings Will and Hannah together.

When Will's father creates a disturbance in his retirement community, Will must return to North Carolina to tend to the family issue. He and his father temporarily rent Hannah's cabin. Soon Hannah and Will are forming a bond, but both have their personal issues that need their full attention and finding a balance between their own lives and the problems surrounding them may be more difficult than either imagined.

This is my introduction to Barbara Claypole White and what an introduction it is. From the very start, I was drawn to Will's character. As Hannah is introduced, I found her equally appealing. Watching them grow throughout The In-Between Hour ended up being a treat, even if many tears were shed along the way.

This is an ideal beach read. It tugs at your heart and holds your attention from start to finish. It left me thinking that I need to start stocking up on other books by Barbara Claypole White in time for my own summer reading moments.


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