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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

The Girl Who Married an Eagle - Tamar Myers



Release Date - April 2013

Tamar Myers
William Morrow

Book Review by Bob Walch

Based on an event from the author’s own life, this is the tale of two young women, one American and the other African. Julia Elaine Newton leaves her home in Ohio to volunteer in a mission in the Belgian Congo. The beautiful young American ends up teaching in an all-girls boarding school that has become a refuge for native runaway child brides.

A far cry from her experiences in a small Mid-western Bible college, Julia is about to experience a culture she really isn’t prepared for and she’ll be working with individuals with some interesting ideas about white people. 
 
Buakane is a young girl who has run away to avoid marriage to a tribal leader named Chief Eagle. As the youngest and newest wife of the chief, tradition demands that Buakane will be buried alive with the man when he dies and she fears that event will come sooner rather than later. She doesn’t relish the idea of a premature death, so she runs from it. 
 
As she attempts to protect this young woman from her vindictive would-be husband, Julia comes to terms with a culture she is learning about through trial and error. Along with Cripple, her native servant, and a few other adults, Julia must protect Buakane and the rest of the school’s girls as Congolese independence nears. Realizing where his child bride is, Chief Eagle is determined to exact his revenge on her protectors and claim his property. As power is about to be turned over to the natives, this becomes a serious threat and one Julia must meet head on.

An atmospheric novel with plenty of colorful characters and cultural nuances Western readers should appreciate, The Girl Who Married an Eagle is a riveting read which also exhibits an entirely new dimension to Tamar Myers’ fiction.

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