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Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Emory's Gift - W. Bruce Cameron



Released September 2011

W. Bruce Cameron
Forge

Book Review by Tracy Farnsworth

Many are likely familiar with Bruce Cameron's bestselling A Dog's Purpose. I, however, adored the television show 8 Simple Rules and know him best from the book that led to the show.  (8 Simple Rules starred the late John Ritter, Kaley Cuoco of Big Bang Theory, and Katey Sagal of Married With Children). Emory's Gift is his latest release, and it's another win for fans of animal fiction.

Charlie Hall's reeling from the death of his mother and his father's withdrawal. When Charlie's dad throws himself into a new business venture, Charlie is left alone for hours a day. He doesn't fit in at school, often becoming the target of a bully, and simply doesn't have someone to talk to or offer guidance. That all changes when Charlie comes face to face with a grizzly bear while out fishing.

Emory's Gift is easily an adult or a teen fiction story. It's really Charlie's coming of age tale, but there's almost a paranormal aspect to the tale that will appeal to all ages. I admit, I couldn't understand how the paranormal theme would carry the story, yet I didn't want to stop reading because I really felt urged to uncover the mystery. For that reason, the book became impossible to put down.

I can't say this was my favorite book. It did take paths that I ended up questioning if I'd have loved the novel rather than liked it had the author done things differently. Yet, I also find myself drifting back to plot points thinking about how I could easily relate to some things Charlie endured and that made it pretty hard to forget.


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