Note to Readers

Roundtable Reviews receives many galley and ARC copies for review. Please understand that the finished copy may differ from the copies we have reviewed.

I have not received any compensation for writing this post other than a free digital or galley copy of the book. I have no material connection to the publisher, agent, or author whose book/s I am reviewing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Vampire Art Now - Jasmine Becket-Griffith & Matthew David Becket




Released September 2011

Jasmine Becket-Griffith
HarperCollins

Reviewed by Tracy Farnsworth

I can't draw. I'm great at doodles, but ask me to draw a person and trust in the fact that you'll get someone with hands the size of their head, legs that are misshapen with knees the size of a bread loaf and eyes that look seriously deformed. Yet, art fascinates me. I adore Monet and Renoir, basically anything to do with the Impressionists.

Given that, I eagerly dove into Vampire Art Now because while some of it is rather grotesque and frightening, it's art. (I must apologize to my daughter who was engrossed in her history homework when I walked in and showed her the images of some very creepy looking dolls, thus making her jump about four feet in and air as she screamed. Sorry I laughed, but the look on your face was hilarious.) For anyone who buys this book, they're in Chapter 4: Graveyard Grotesque.

In a world fascinated with vampires, Vampire Art Now is going to impress many readers, movie enthusiasts and even TV fanatics. If you watch True Blood, have read or seen Stephenie Meyer's Twilight books and movies or go back to the roots with Bram Stoker, Bela Lugosi and Nosferatu, you'll really enjoy this art book.

The collection of drawings, photographs, paintings and sculpted items are broken into a number of categories:

  • The Aristocracy & Victoriana
  • Vampiric Vixens
  • Contemporary Goth and Urban Undead
  • Graveyard Grotesque
  • Vampire Hunters and the Hunted
  • Undead in the Darkroom
  • Cartoons and Comics
  • Bloodlust and Bittersweet Romance
  • Dracula and His Disguises
  • Gothic Quarters

The book closes with a listing of the artists who contributed their art for this project. The directory includes websites, emails and the works of art appearing in the book. When you're looking at the art, each piece includes a description into the history or idea behind the artistic work. It's incredibly thorough and, at times, pretty creepy.

1 comment:

  1. Great review! The chapters in the book sound really interesting. Who new that vampires could be broken up into so many different categories. I can't wait to see the book for myself!

    ReplyDelete