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Wednesday, March 9, 2011

An Apple a Day - Caroline Taggart




Released March 2011

www.rd.com

Reviewed by Tracy Farnsworth

An Apple a Day: Old-Fashioned Proverbs--Timeless Words to Live By looks at some of the popular proverbs used every day. You've likely heard the majority of the phrases within this book. A few may be new to you. However, you may not know the origins of these proverbs. Caroline Taggart takes an in-depth look at them all offering insight and phrases with similar meanings.

Caroline Taggart's book is a very easy read. It takes little time to read it front to back. Or, you could read one quote per day and really let the phrase and meaning sink in. The format is simple to follow, everything is alphabetical. Plus, you're likely to have a number of "Oh, that's why..." moments. I know I did.

One that really caught my attention, I heard many times following the tragic rape and murder of a girl in my high school -- "Whom the gods love dies young." The phrase was the work of an Ancient Greek playwright. Billy Joel's "Only the Good Die Young" is virtually the same thing. Meanwhile, I'm always baffled by the statement because Mother Teresa at 87 was certainly not young, and she portrays the very essence of being "good."

If you get into etymology, An Apple a Day is a must-own. It's not going to take up tons of room on your shelf. Plus, you're going to learn some interesting tidbits along the way.

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