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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Psych: The Call of the Mild - William Rabkin (Series Mystery)
















Released January 2010

www.penguin.com
www.usanetwork.com

Based on the popular television show, Psych: The Call of the Mild finds Shawn Spencer and his buddy Gus out in the wilderness. What starts with a simple request to find a missing piece of jewelry leads the men on a journey they never expected. Ellen Svaco's necklace came off during a class field trip and she wants Spencer to find it. Seems easy enough, but then nothing is ever easy. They face an evil mime, killer trains and much, much more. There is a lot more to this plot, but as much of the action takes place in the second half of the book, I don't want to give any potential spoilers.

I've never gotten into the television show. It's good, but given the time it's on here, I rarely stay awake for it. I am, however, a huge fan of the book series. I love the witty nature of Shawn and Gus and definitely find them intriguing.

From the start, The Call of the Mild drew me in. I loved the banter as they tackled their latest case and especially their dealings with the gun toting mime. However, as the story progressed, I found myself losing interest. That's unusual for me. By the end of the book, I was struggling to keep going.

Perhaps it was the different sub-plots that distracted me. I'm really not sure, but it seemed that the story lost steam in the middle and that's when I started struggling.

Given that, I'm hesitant to decide what others would think. Long-time fans of the show will find that the story is told from Gus's point of view, which is a nice change of pace. Just like the Monk books are told from Natalie's POV, I do like getting more insight from someone other than the main character. But, even then, this book just wasn't enough for me to think I'd ever want to pay full price for it. Great find if you come across it at a book sale or flea market, but otherwise, it's one I would have skipped.

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