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Monday, January 18, 2010

Pork & Beans Bread Commentary

After reading Joanne Fluke's Plum Pudding Murder, I was somewhat disgusted by the thought of Pork & Beans Bread. However, I also happen to know that she's a great cook and nothing she's ever dished up has been inedible.



The more I thought about it, the more I wondered if it was possible to turn a soupy can of pasty beans into something delicious. I had a friend who'd given me boxes of canned food she'd inherited and couldn't use, so I decided to give it a shot.

Essentially, Pork and Beans Bread is the combination of sugar, eggs, flour, vegetable oil, leaveners, cinnamon and walnuts or pecans. I opted for walnuts because: a. they're cheaper and b. I like the taste of them in my quick breads.




With that, I put a can of pork and beans into my blender and pureed it to a mushy mess. Because it was very thick, I went a step ahead and added the oil to the mix in the blender too, though the recipe didn't state to do that. I poured that mix into the remaining ingredients, turned on my Kitchenaid and let it do the work. After pouring the batter into two prepared loaf pans, I put them into the pre-heated oven and crossed my fingers.

At this point, there were two options. One, the bread was disgusting. Given the recipe came from Joanne Fluke, I figured it might surprise me, kind of like Campbell's tomato soup cake which is my favorite of all non-chocolate cakes.

The smell that filled my home was great. The bread smelled very much like zucchini bread. After it baked and cooled, I cut myself and my husband a piece and both of us were delighted with the results. It tastes a little like pumpkin bread and zucchini bread, but with a twist. It certainly is edible and he's already said anytime I want to whip up another batch, he'd be happy to bring it to work.

Lesson learned - don't judge a recipe by its ingredients.

2 comments:

  1. It's been so long since you posted, I don't even know if you will even see this...I just ran across it. I am so glad you liked the bread! I gave the recipe to Joanne. After reading one of her books, and then hunting the rest of them down, I started writing to her, and figured that would be a recipe she would like. I am the Jan in her book and we DO own Vic's cafe. LOL! Just a little trivia I thought you might enjoy...

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  2. I see all posts, doesn't matter how old. :-)

    It's a fabulous bread. I've made it dozens of times for friends, family, etc. without telling them what is in it first. Once they rave over how tasty it is, then I'll tell them. Thanks for sharing it because it really is an amazing spice bread!

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